Tag Archives: Acceptable Worship

Acceptable Worship: An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People

Romans 12:13, Mt. Pinatubo Crater Lake, Zambales Mountains, Philippines
Mt. Pinatubo Crater Lake, Zambales Mountains, Philippines | May 2012

Romans 12:13 contributing to the needs of the saints, practicing hospitality.

Trials and difficulties are inevitable, and it is during times of difficulties that we ought to help those who are in need especially the saints or the family of believers.

Contributing to the needs of the saints

“Contributing” in the Greek is koinōnéō which means to have a share of, to have fellowship with, to participate and share in. It is making another’s necessities one’s own as to relieve them.

To love is to meet the needs of others. Sincerely loving fellow believers would drive us to share in their needs. The 1st century church has shown an excellent example in contributing to the needs of fellow believers.

All the believers were together and had everything in common. They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. (Acts 2:44-45)

All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of their possessions was their own, but they shared everything they had. With great power the apostles continued to testify to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus. And God’s grace was so powerfully at work in them all that there were no needy persons among them. For from time to time those who owned land or houses sold them, brought the money from the sales and put it at the apostles’ feet, and it was distributed to anyone who had need. Joseph, a Levite from Cyprus, whom the apostles called Barnabas (which means “son of encouragement”), sold a field he owned and brought the money and put it at the apostles’ feet. (Acts 4:32-37)

This example is going against the grain of society. The world thinks only of oneself and what one can benefit, but the Lord teaches us to be set apart from the world. The early church had everything in common and that is what we are also called to do. The resources we have are entrusted to us for God’s purposes, for the advancement of His Kingdom, for His glory.

Practicing hospitality

Interestingly, the word “practicing” in the Greek is diṓkō which means pursue with all haste, to chase after; earnestly desiring to overtake or apprehend. It is the same root word used for persecute, so negatively it means to zealously persecute or hunt down, and positively, it means to earnestly pursue, to seek after eagerly, earnestly endeavor to acquire.

Then the word “hospitality” in the Greek is philoxenia which means love to strangers. It is the warmth and friendliness shown to strangers; figuratively it means the readiness to share hospitality, hence also generosity, by entertaining in one’s home, etc. This means that we are called not only to be hospitable to those we are closely related with but even with those who are not in our circle of close friends because they are still part of the family of believers.

Practicing hospitality is more than just being friendly and welcoming to guests but also being ready and earnestly pursuing love to strangers. The writer of Hebrews also said, “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers” (Hebrews 13:2a). Peter also said in 1 Peter 4:9 to “offer hospitality to one another without grumbling.”

Conclusion

An attitude of generosity comes from having a proper perspective on the resources the Lord has given us.

…Godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that. Those who want to get rich fall into temptation and a trap and into many foolish and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil. Some people, eager for money, have wandered from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs. (1 Timothy 6:16-10)

Contributing to the needs of the saints and practicing hospitality are marks of a sacrificial love. It requires us to share in the needs of others by making their necessities as part of our own. It also involves us to eagerly pursue showing love to strangers and being ready to offer help for a fellow believer.

Sincere love seeks the good of the beloved and reaches out to meet their needs. It is going out of one’s comfort zone and valuing others as more significant than ourselves.

As family of believers, we are called to be devoted one another deeply, to serve the Body selflessly and zealously, to love genuinely, to set an example in honoring others in humility, to persevere in tribulations, and to meet other’s needs. This is our spiritual service of worship, in view of God’s mercy and everything He has done for us.

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6:19-21) 

Romans 12 Personal Study Series:
Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God (Romans 12:1-2)
Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service (Romans 12:3-8)
Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character (Romans 12:9-10)
Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord (Romans 12:11)
Acceptable Worship: Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation (Romans 12:12)
Acceptable Worship: An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People (Romans 12:13)

References:
Interlinear Bible
Parallel Bible

For further understanding of Romans 12 you can check these sites: GCF’s sermon series on RomansJohn MacArthur’s sermon series on Romans or Bible.Org

Acceptable Worship: Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation

Mt. Pulag, Romans 12:12, joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer,
Mt. Pulag, Cordillera Central, Philippines | May 2010

Romans 12:12 Rejoicing in hope, persevering in tribulation, devoted to prayer.

By God’s grace, as we submit to be conformed to His character, sincerely love one another, value others above ourselves and humbly serve the Lord with all our hearts, we will encounter difficulties and trials. The Bible tells us many times that we will go through sufferings.

Paul said in 2 Timothy 3:12 that everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted.

After commanding His disciples to love one another, Jesus warned them in John 15:18-21, “If the world hates you, keep in mind that it hated me first. If you belonged to the world, it would love you as its own. As it is, you do not belong to the world, but I have chosen you out of the world. That is why the world hates you. Remember what I told you: ‘A servant is not greater than his master.’ If they persecuted me, they will persecute you also. If they obeyed my teaching, they will obey yours also. They will treat you this way because of my name, for they do not know the one who sent me.” 

And in John 16:33, Jesus said, “In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.”

In the same way, Paul exhorts us to rejoice in our hope — the confident expectation of our eternal salvation paid by the blood of Jesus for the forgiveness of our sins. To rejoice literally means to experience God’s grace and be glad for it. This joyfulness of heart is not dependent on a favorable circumstance or on having a positive disposition because regardless of the circumstance God’s grace is abundant and His promises are true. Our hope is sure and we can rejoice because we know that He who promised is faithful.

Joy in our hope comes from focusing our hearts and our minds on the steadfast character of the Lord. This gives us encouragement and allows us to persevere in tribulation and hold fast on His promises as we wait with eager expectation of that future glory that will be revealed in us.

We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they help us develop endurance. And endurance develops strength of character, and character strengthens our confident hope of salvation. And this hope will not lead to disappointment. For we know how dearly God loves us, because he has given us the Holy Spirit to fill our hearts with his love. (Romans 5:3-5)

It is when we go through trials that we become more prayerful. The more intense our affliction, the more persistent and fervent we are in prayer. Being devoted in prayer means to continue steadfastly and wait upon the Lord as we pray, to consistently show strength which prevails in spite of difficulties. 

The Lord uses our trials to mold us into the likeness of Christ to bring Him glory and our confident hope and constancy in prayer sustains us to persevere through it.

Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. (2 Corinthians 4:16-18)

Romans 12 Personal Study Series:
Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God (Romans 12:1-2)
Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service (Romans 12:3-8)
Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character (Romans 12:9-10)
Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord (Romans 12:11)
Acceptable Worship:  Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation (Romans 12:12)
Acceptable Worship:  An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People (Romans 12:13)

References:
Interlinear Bible
Parallel Bible
Bible.Org

For further understanding of Romans 12 you can check these sites: GCF’s sermon series on Romans or John MacArthur’s sermon series on Romans.

Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord

Philippine International Hot Air Balloon Fiesta, Clark Freeport, Pampanga, Philippines, Romans 12:11, zeal, fervor, serve the Lord, acceptable worship
Clark Freeport, Pampanga, Philippines | February 2011

Romans 12:11 Not lagging behind in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord.

Not lagging behind in diligence…

Lagging behind” means slothful, lazy, sluggish, hesitating hence be tardy or delayed. In classical Greek, it means indolent which refers to shrinking backward, because unready. The idea of ‘delay’ underlies the secondary sense, ‘burdensome, troublesome’ – a vexation arising from weary waiting.

Of course the word not negates the attitude of “lagging behind”.

While the word “diligence” (“zeal” in other versions) in Greek is spoudḗ which means to hurry, to make haste. It is moving with swiftness to show zealous diligence, giving one’s best and full effort by making haste. It also means earnestness and enthusiasm in accomplishing, promoting, or striving after anything.  For the believer, it means quickly obeying what the Lord reveals is His priority. This elevates the better over the good – the more important over the important – and does so with earnest swiftness.

Therefore not lagging behind in diligence is not only about hard work, persistence and painstaking effort but starts with a heart full of eagerness and enthusiastic zeal in serving the Lord; manifested in swift obedience, in earnestness in giving one’s best and total commitment in accomplishing a task, not losing momentum or becoming weary but always ready to do the work of the Lord.

I will hasten and not delay to obey your commands. (Psalm 119:60)

We want each of you to show this same diligence to the very end, so that what you hope for may be fully realized. We do not want you to become lazy, but to imitate those who through faith and patience inherit what has been promised. (Hebrews 6:11-12)

Fervent in spirit…

Fervent literally means to boil with heat, to burn in spirit. This describes the intensity of our service to the Lord; it should not be lukewarm or cold but boiling in the spirit.

Figuratively, it means to show great zeal; to be ardently passionate, “boiling” with interest or desire; to be deeply committed to something, with the implication of accompanying desire – ‘to be earnest, to set one’s heart on, to be completely intent upon’.

We are also reminded by Paul in 2 Timothy 1:6 to fan into flame the gift of God.

… Serving the Lord. 

Serving in this verse means to be a slave. We serve the Lord, not as an employed servant or a temporary volunteer but a bond-servant who willingly and totally devotes oneself to permanent servitude for the Lord.

We are called to serve the Lord with haste, with zealous diligence, and with fervent spirit giving our complete devotion to Him; to not only be obedient but also be passionate, full of enthusiasm and excitement in serving Him. Our reason and motivation behind all these go back to everything the Lord has done for us, because of His immeasurable love and unending mercy, He sacrificed Himself for us to save us from our sins and has called us to offer our bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God–this is our true and proper worship (Romans 12:1).

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving. (Colossians 3:23-24)

Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your toil is not in vain in the Lord. (1 Corinthians 15:58)

Romans 12 Personal Study Series:
Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God (Romans 12:1-2)
Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service (Romans 12:3-8)
Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character (Romans 12:9-10)
Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord (Romans 12:11)
Acceptable Worship:  Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation (Romans 12:12)
Acceptable Worship:  An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People (Romans 12:13)

References:
Interlinear Bible
Parallel Bible

For further understanding of Romans 12 you can check these sites: GCF’s sermon series on Romans or John MacArthur’s sermon series on Romans.

Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character

romans 12:9-10, acceptable worship, sunset, beach, mountains, people, Philippines, Anawangin Cove, Zambales
Anawangin Cove, Zambales, Philippines | April 2010

Romans 12: Let love be without hypocrisy. Abhor what is evil; cling to what is good. 10 Be devoted to one another in brotherly love; give preference to one another in honor. 

A love without hypocrisy.

In verse 9, Paul used the Greek word agápē translated as love. It means benevolence, goodwill, esteem. In the New Testament, it typically refers to divine love. 1 John 4:7 says that love comes from God; then in verse 8 it says God is love. Jesus showed His love for us with His selfless service and sacrifice on the cross to save undeserving sinful men. From His example, we see that agápē is an unconditional, self-sacrificing kind of love which seeks the welfare and the highest good of the one loved.

Our love should be without hypocrisy. Without hypocrisy means a sincere behavior free from hidden agendas or selfish motives seeking personal gain. It should be pure, genuine selfless love.

So how can a supposedly selfless love be selfish? This reveals the self-centered sinful nature of man. We can show an outward love and service to others but in reality be self-seeking when it is driven by personal interests or when we manipulate the situation and people for our own benefit. This hidden motive or attitude of the heart negates the very essence of  an agápē kind of love.

We are called to love unconditionally because this is a reflection of God’s character and it can only be possible through the power of the Holy Spirit working in us.

A love that abhors evil and clings to good.

To abhor evil means to detest it utterly. True love without hypocrisy does not trivialize, condone, approve, encourage or partake in what is evil. Instead, it adheres and gives oneself steadfastly to what is good. Sin destroys a loving relationship; and only what is good builds up, restores, and strengthens relationships.

The standard of what is good and evil is not based on one’s own preference or how society defines it but is according to God’s holy character revealed in His Word.

As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.” (1 Peter 1:14-16)

A devoted love for the family of believers.

In verse 10, Paul mentioned two other descriptions of love: philadelphía and philóstorgos. Philadelphía means love and affection for fellow-believers. Philóstorgos means a devoted love shown by family-members, it is a kindly affectionate natural love for one’s family.

Quoting a quote from a sermon, our love for fellow believers should be “…marked by a devotion that is characteristic of a loving, close-knit, and mutually supportive family.” – James Boice (Romans [Baker], 4:1598)

John 1:12-13 says that all who did receive Him (Jesus), to those who believed in His Name, He gave the right to become children of God—children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.

When we were born into a family, we did not choose who our parents and siblings would be, they were chosen by God. Our love for them is not based on preference, attraction, personality, or common interest. In the same way, believers are adopted into God’s family and share the same Heavenly Father not by human decision but of God’s. And Paul exhorts us to love our brothers and sisters in the Lord in an affectionate devoted love as that of our own family, a love that is also not based on our personal preferences, common interests, etc. but on the truth that they are our eternal spiritual family.

A love that gives preference in honoring others. 

To give preference to others in honor means to go before another in valuing others thereby exhibiting the right example so others can follow. It means we are not waiting for others to value us or another person by giving honor, respect, esteem, or serve and meet the need, instead we should have a mindset of doing it first and outdo one another in showing honor.

A genuine, sincere unconditional love does not think of what it can benefit from the situation or from other people rather it seeks to find ways in showing love, meeting the need and building others up. It gives preference to others above oneself. A character of humility and selflessness that Jesus exemplified. 

Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others. In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus. (Philippians 2:3-5)

Romans 12 Personal Study Series:
Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God (Romans 12:1-2)
Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service (Romans 12:3-8)
Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character (Romans 12:9-10)
Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord (Romans 12:11)
Acceptable Worship:  Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation (Romans 12:12)
Acceptable Worship:  An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People (Romans 12:13)

References:
Interlinear Bible
Parallel Bible
Bible.Org

For further understanding of Romans 12 you can check these sites: GCF’s sermon series on Romans or John MacArthur’s sermon series on Romans.

 

Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service

Mark 10:45, cross, Jesus Christ, servanthood, love, selfless service, meaningful service, humble service, humility, mountain, acceptable worship
Mt. Pinatubo, Zambales, Philippines | May 2012

Continuation of the study on Romans 12.

For through the grace given to me I say to everyone among you not to think more highly of himself than he ought to think; but to think so as to have sound judgment, as God has allotted to each a measure of faith.For just as we have many members in one body and all the members do not have the same function, so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another. Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, each of us is to exercise them accordingly: if prophecy, according to the proportion of his faith;if service, in his serving; or he who teaches, in his teaching; or he who exhorts, in his exhortation; he who gives, with liberality; he who leads, with diligence; he who shows mercy, with cheerfulness.

In view of everything the Lord has done for us, the only proper response is to worship and the very essence of it is to give Him glory. He has called us to present our bodies as a living and holy sacrifice, pleasing to God — which is our reasonable act of worship. A sacrifice acceptable to Him because it is offered according to His terms; otherwise it ceases to be a form of worship.

Through the power of the Holy Spirit, He has given us a new nature. He commands us not to be like the world; not to act, think, speak, behave like the world; not to value and pursue its empty ways; not let ourselves be deceived by its beliefs. Instead, we ought to submit ourselves to God and allow Him to transform us in the likeness of His character, holy and pleasing to Him, distinct from the world, set apart to be used for His purpose. We let our minds be renewed by soaking ourselves in God’s Word. Then we will learn to know His will for us — His good, pleasing and perfect will.

When we became a believer in Christ we have become part of His Body. Just as the different parts of our body has different functions, the same is true with the Church. Jesus is the Head and the Church is His Body. In his grace, He has given each of us different gifts, according to the measure of faith God has allotted us, to enable us to serve our specific and unique functions in the Body of Christ.

Just like our fingerprints, no two gifts are alike. No two people can serve exactly the same way. A hand cannot do the function of other body parts, nor can the left hand serve as a right hand. A body cannot also be all eyes, there has to be different parts. Knowing this will help us understand that we need each other. We form parts of one Body and we all belong to one another. We perform our functions thereby serving the Body to edify and strengthen one another until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ. (Ephesians 4:13)

To serve our purpose in the Body the way that is acceptable to God, we ought to have a right notion of ourselves. This brings us back to who we are in the Lord. We serve with a heart of offering ourselves to the Lord as living, holy sacrifice pleasing to Him to bring Him glory. Therefore the proper attitude of service is humility before a holy God. It should not be done with an attitude of pride, arrogance, or vain conceit. Neither should we have an attitude of self-abasement or self-deprecation and choose not to serve at all. These two examples are focused on self, on one’s own strength and capability or the lack of it. To quote what John MacArthur said in his sermon, “Humility is not obviously overestimation, nor is it underestimation, it is right estimation.”

Paul exhorts us to think of ourselves with sober mind. We ought to have an attitude of God-confidence knowing that the Lord has given each of us different gifts for the purpose of using every part to edify the Body, to meet the needs of others according to what the Lord has called us to do. A capability not our own but only by the grace of God and we are confident in the Lord that He will use us and maximize our God-given potentials for His glory. So we have nothing to boast or be afraid of because the gift is from God, the power to use it is also from Him and the fruit is His work. Unworthy as we are, He has given us the privilege and joy to be used according to how He purposed us to be and to witness His glory as we serve Him.

It is good to remember that when we serve, our heart’s desire should be:
>to offer ourselves as a living and holy sacrifice acceptable to God,
>to be faithful stewards of what God entrusted us and has specifically purposed us to do,
>to imitate God’s character and follow Jesus’ example of service.
“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve…” (Mark 10:45)

Romans 12 Personal Study Series:
Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God (Romans 12:1-2)
Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service (Romans 12:3-8)
Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character (Romans 12:9-10)
Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord (Romans 12:11)
Acceptable Worship:  Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation (Romans 12:12)
Acceptable Worship:  An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People (Romans 12:13)

References:
Interlinear Bible
Parallel Bible

This is a summary not an exhaustive study. For further understanding of Romans 12 you can check these sites: GCF’s sermon series on Romans or John MacArthur’s sermon series on Romans.

Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God

Romans 12:1, Bible, present your bodies, offer yourselves, offering, sacrifice, living sacrifice, holy to the Lord, acceptable to God, spiritual worship, Mt. Pulag, Sunrise, mountaineering, hiking, trekking, early morning, sun, orange sun, blue sky, clear sky, ambangeg trail, its more fun in the Philippines, Philippines
Mt. Pulag, Cordillera Central, Philippines | May 2010

I asked the Lord how to deal with a specific situation that keeps on happening for quite some time now. The verse that was brought to my mind was: “Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.” (Romans 12:21)

As I read through the whole chapter, checking the verse and its context, I was amazed because I haven’t seen or understood it this way before. I usually see it as three main points connected to each other just like how it is divided into section headings but I haven’t seen it as one whole text on the basis of the first verse. And the last verse “Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good” is a very fitting conclusion. So I would like to share what I have learned hoping that you too may be equally blessed.

A summarized study on Romans 12.

Therefore I urge you, brethren, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living and holy sacrifice, acceptable to God, which is your spiritual service of worship. And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect.

The Lord has shown His love, mercy and grace for us by redeeming us from our sins and reconciling us back to Him through faith in Christ Jesus our Lord. Having known and experienced this truth, the proper response is to worship and give Him glory. Confessing Him as Lord and savior means we ought to surrender our lives to Him. Presenting our bodies as a living sacrifice, set apart for His specific purpose for us, living our lives according to the likeness of His character, distinct from the world, and pleasing to Him. This our divinely reasonable worship – a sacrifice acceptable to Him because it is offered on His terms.

Having been accustomed to our sinful nature and the pattern of this world, prior to us knowing Christ, the Lord commands us not to be identified with the world any longer. Instead, we should be different from it as God has given us a new nature in the likeness of His character. We should not live as though we are still of the world, holding the same values and having the same mind and character with it.

The world pursues after: success, power, fame, money, etc. All these are sought for the benefit of self: self-interest, self-satisfaction, self-image, self-esteem, self-actualization, self-preservation, and the list goes on. We were deceived and once ignorant of the truth that the world does not revolve around us and the things it values are fleeting and empty.

Through God’s grace, He made us understand that He has created us for Himself to bring Him glory and not to ourselves or even other created things; that we are not at the center, God is; that He is the only one who can ever satisfy us, not anything or anyone else that we pursue in this world.

So how do we veer away from that ignorance and deception? By knowing the truth and filling our mind with the truth. Jesus said, “Sanctify them by the truth; your word is truth.” (John 17:17)

Accordingly, the Lord also commands us to be transformed in keeping with our inner reality or new nature and be changed in the character of Christ by the renewing of our minds through the daily reading, study and meditation of God’s Word. This is an act of surrender to the Lord — letting the Holy Spirit transform us by the renewing of our minds through His Word. It is His work and His Word, all we need to do is to submit.

Then, through testing, we will learn to know what God’s will is — His good, pleasing and perfect will. The more we know the Lord through His Word, the deeper our understanding on what is an acceptable worship for Him. When we know and continue to seek the Truth then we would not be easily deceived by the lies of the world and be dragged along with it. Instead, our minds would be renewed and we would be transformed in the likeness of the character of Christ by making His Word true in our lives through our obedience to Him.

Romans 12 Personal Study Series:
Acceptable Worship: An Offering Prescribed by God (Romans 12:1-2)
Acceptable Worship: A Selfless Service (Romans 12:3-8)
Acceptable Worship: A Love That Conforms to God’s Character (Romans 12:9-10)
Acceptable Worship: A Zealous and Fervent Service to the Lord (Romans 12:11)
Acceptable Worship: Joyful, Prayerful and Persevering in Tribulation (Romans 12:12)
Acceptable Worship: An Eagerness to Meet the Needs of God’s People (Romans 12:13)

References:
Interlinear Bible
Parallel Bible

This is a summary not an exhaustive study. For further understanding of Romans 12 you can check these sites: GCF’s sermon series on Romans or John MacArthur’s sermon series on Romans.